Just In: School Officials & Sheriff’s Deputy Knew Cruz Was A Threat Back in 2016 – What They Wanted To Do Explains Everything

Elder Patriot – The Associated Press has obtained documents that show school shooter Nikolas Cruz had been singled out by officials at Marjory Stoneman Douglas H.S., along with the sheriff’s deputy to be involuntarily committed for a mental evaluation.

According to the Orlando Sentinel:

“The documents, which are part of Cruz’s criminal case in the shooting, show that he had written the word “kill” in a notebook, told a classmate that he wanted to buy a gun and use it, and had cut his arm supposedly in anger because he had broken up with a girlfriend. He also told another student he had drunk gasoline and was throwing up. Calls had even been made to the FBI about the possibility of Cruz using a gun at school.

“The documents were provided by a psychological assessment service initiated by Cruz’s mother called Henderson Behavioral Health. The documents show a high school resource officer who was also a sheriff’s deputy and two school counselors recommended in September 2016 that Cruz be committed for mental evaluation under Florida’s Baker Act. That law allows for involuntary commitment for mental health examination for at least three days.”

That sheriff’s deputy was Scot Peterson, the same deputy who refused to enter the building once Cruz started shooting.

If Peterson’s recommendation had been followed it would have made it impossible for Cruz to obtain a firearm legally.

Documents obtained from Henderson Behavioral Health quote Cruz’s mother Lynda as saying she had fresh concerns about her son’s mental state after he punched holes in a wall at their home in Parkland. 

The documents show that Cruz was very much on the radar screen of mental health professionals and the Broward County school system, yet very little was done.

“Other red flags have also surfaced, including calls to the FBI about Cruz’s potential to become a school shooter and numerous visits by county law enforcement officials to his home – both before his mother died in November and after, when he lived briefly with a family friend in Palm Beach County.

“Again, very little was done.”

The New York Times reported that Cruz, himself even called authorities to discuss his emotional distress.

The more we learn the more we learn that all roads lead back to the failure of those who have been entrusted with keeping us safe.  The existing laws have been sufficient.  They have failed us. 

Because of their failures, they must go, not the Second Amendment rights of law-abiding Americans.